HELP FOR PARENTS WITH STRONG-WILLED, OUT-OF-CONTROL CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS

Education and Counseling for Individuals Affected by Oppositional Defiant Disorder and ADHD

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6 comments:

Anonymous said...

Help, my 17 year old son is continually skipping school, exams have always caused anxiety but just these past months his attitude has changed to "I'll go to school if I want to." We've tried punishment , rewards, ignorance, hoping he'll grow out of this stage! He's running us and his teachers out of patience. Any ideas??

Anonymous said...

I have the same trouble with my daughter. To the point she now comes and goes as if she is an adult. We have tried everything. Last night her father and her had words about her doing as she pleases and he lost his temper telling her to go and unfortunately she did. i just cant keep doing this any longer. I love her to bits but dislike her at the same time. i need to to let her go and learn life's hard lessons but as a mum I so want to protect her. She is extremely intelligent but doesnt care. All my support is slowly disappearing as everyone is over the drama. I have no legal avenues apparently in Australia as she hasnt been charged with a crime and she doesnt want help. I just want my daughter back. there still is the good child in side but She doesnt let her out often. Please give me some advice. My three other children have all grown into wonderful adults even though they tested boundaries younger. But they always had respect for others. This daughter doesnt. i dont know where I went wrong or how to correct it. I have tried the information in the course but she doesnt relent. I cant continue on much longer it is tearing my family apart and i am normally a strong person but I have reached my breaking point.

Anonymous said...

I can feel your pain. I have the same problem . I don't know where i went wrong either...

Anonymous said...

My daughter is 14 and you just discribed her to a tee. She comes and goes as she pleases. She hides in amongst a group of friends. She comes home and baths changes clothes..then sneaks back out. When I got the e-book I did as suggested said I made mistakes and we are going to try something that I felt would help everyone. I only said that and that i felt a contract was needed. She agreed verbally then here we are over a week later her outings have increased and everything has esulated. At least reading these comments lets one know you are not alone in this heart wrenching journey of teenhood. I am constantly reminding myself that the only safe place to be that offers any solice is stay in my heart. Behaviour can change I think some will need to take a hard road for their lessons... that is the burden of parenthood that is hard to bear. We all want our children to take paths where they are less likely to stumble and fall. For some reason I feel we are dealing with a generation that has no sense of guilt or empathy as to what their actions brings on their family or anyone else they impact on. Its darnright discouraging. I have no answers really at this point I feel like shes in control and I'm on one horrible ride I never wanted.

Anonymous said...

As much as I am sad to see everyone's comments, I'm relieved to know that I'm not alone.

My 15 year old step-son is failing out of his school geared for Aspies. His behavior is so disruptive to the other students that his mother is picking him up from school @ their request. He has constant meltdowns, is physically aggressive & refuses to do any of his schoolwork.

I feel so hopeless in this situation and frightened @ the consequences of just letting him go. It's straining my new marriage & both my husband & I dread spending time with the boy any more.

Anonymous said...

Question: Parent A & B have 3 children. Parent A works from home and is with two of the children all day while the older 3rd child is at school. Parent B works away from home and spends less time with the children. Parent A doesn't discipline the children because they are with them more and says for this reason they can't discipline or discipline doesn't work because they are with the children more. Does this make sense? Why would someone say or think this?

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